Bag Of Milk Chocolate Chip CookiesI direct a nutrition clinic in a large center for children with special needs, the Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. My “kids” can have everything from mild learning disabilities to genetic disorders that affect growth and development to profound intellectual and physical impairments that cause them to be unable to walk, speak or even scratch their heads. My most seriously involved kids are completely dependent for all their care.

Children who are somewhere in between—for example, children who are unable able to walk but who can feed themselves and communicate with others—pose challenges if they become overweight or obese. That’s because some of the usual advice we’ve all heard, “Eat less and exercise more,” is less applicable to a child (or an adult, for that matter) who is not ambulatory and can’t be physically active. [click to continue…]

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Einstein Class of 2018 M.D. students heading to an orientation event

Einstein Class of 2018 M.D. students heading to an orientation event.

To the incoming Albert Einstein College of Medicine Class of 2018, congratulations on your admission to medical school! Be prepared for an onslaught of information: advice, tips, good wishes, pointers, greetings, suggestions and introductions.

This post is part of that mix, but it will be brief! [click to continue…]

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EDITORS’ NOTE: Choosing a research lab is a pivotal decision in the trajectory of a biomedical sciences graduate student or physician scientist. After two or three laboratory rotations, Ph.D. candidates (at the end of the first year) and M.D./Ph.D. candidates (at the end of the second year) determine which labs are exploring the scientific questions that interest them most and which represent the best fit in terms of lab culture and environment.

Teresa Bowman, Ph.D. | Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Teresa Bowman, Ph.D.

Each year, more than 100 Einstein faculty members and graduate students gather for a poster session to showcase their research while providing a forum for Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. candidates to ask questions and learn more about specific research from later-year graduate students and principal investigators.

Following Einstein’s session earlier this month, we asked fourth-year Ph.D. candidate Abubakar Jalloh and PI Teresa Bowman, Ph.D. for their perspectives on pursuing scientific discovery at Einstein. Abu and three other students also shared their experiences on camera at the event. [click to continue…]

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Last week, findings from a small but notable University of California–Davis study showed that intervening earlier than usual with infants who show signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can help prevent them from developing the disorder by the time they reach age 3 or 4. For perspective, we spoke with Einstein’s Dr. Lisa Shulman, a neurodevelopmental pediatrician and featured contributor to this blog. She explains how the study’s findings mirror what she sees in clinical practice at Einstein’s Children’s Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center and offers takeaways for clinicians and parents.

What are the most important findings of this study? [click to continue…]

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Vern L. Schramm, Ph.D. in the lab at Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Vern L. Schramm, Ph.D., in his biochemistry lab at Albert Einstein College of Medicine

One thousand dollars per pill?

A single treatment course for hepatitis C virus to cost $83,000?

How can those prices be justified?

The drug-discovery process is a long one, fraught with disappointments and massive investment, no matter what the outcome. Some pharmaceutical companies argue that the high prices charged for their rare “blockbuster” drugs help them recover research and development costs. [click to continue…]

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Sabriya Stukes, Ph.D. - Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Einstein graduate student Sabriya Stukes at the Bronx Zoo explaining her research on host-pathogen interactions during the Bronx Science Consortium Student Symposium

What’s the best way to convey scientific information to nonscientists?

That’s a question young investigator Sabriya Stukes pondered this week at the second annual student research symposium sponsored by the Bronx Science Consortium. The event comes on the heels of Stukes successfully defending her Ph.D. in microbiology & immunology at Einstein. [click to continue…]

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