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Scientist typing

This raises an important question: When the FDA and similar agencies make decisions on public health issues that are intertwined with science, do the larger scientific and medical communities wield any influence?

Einstein Global Health Fellowship participant examines child in Himalayas (India).

Ten years ago I was working with some friends on a joint project at the Central Nairobi YMCA. In a park on the outskirts of town one afternoon, I watched as a group of kids from a nearby orphanage—dressed up in party clothes—came into the area with a group of non-Kenyan sponsors. The well-meaning adults Read More

garred-special-tool-lenses

What can I do to help? It’s a daunting question that ―in light of recent domestic and world events― seems increasingly difficult to answer properly. Some actions seem beyond reach and others feel as if they might be trite gestures that fail to accomplish much of anything. And yet, we hear stories almost daily at Read More

Hand holding bag containing human organ for transplant

Over the past several years, I’ve written in this blog about several incidents involving informed consent (Informed Consent for Babies: When Experts Disagree; Informed Consent in Infant Research: Ethical Problems Remain; and Informed Consent in Comparative Effectiveness Research). The issue is back, this time with a twist. In the latest episode, a study involving kidney Read More

The author as a student in the EEP program at Einstein, circa 2007.

A recent publication by the Association of American Medical Colleges reports that only 4 percent of physicians in the U.S. are black, and that there were fewer black men enrolled in medical school in 2014 than in 1978. This striking and disheartening shortage holds serious consequences for all of society. Studies show that less diversity amongst physicians has major implications for healthcare disparities, and negatively Read More

Photo by Livy Low

On my last day of rotation in the psychiatric emergency room, we received a new patient. The keywords and phrases rang through the air: “teenager,” “transgender,” “homeless,” “assaulted recently,” “says she feels a full-grown baby kicking.” I immediately asked if I could see this patient, and was sent out to admit her.