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Hand holding bag containing human organ for transplant

Over the past several years, I’ve written in this blog about several incidents involving informed consent (Informed Consent for Babies: When Experts Disagree; Informed Consent in Infant Research: Ethical Problems Remain; and Informed Consent in Comparative Effectiveness Research). The issue is back, this time with a twist. In the latest episode, a study involving kidney Read More

The author as a student in the EEP program at Einstein, circa 2007.

A recent publication by the Association of American Medical Colleges reports that only 4 percent of physicians in the U.S. are black, and that there were fewer black men enrolled in medical school in 2014 than in 1978. This striking and disheartening shortage holds serious consequences for all of society. Studies show that less diversity amongst physicians has major implications for healthcare disparities, and negatively Read More

Photo by Livy Low

On my last day of rotation in the psychiatric emergency room, we received a new patient. The keywords and phrases rang through the air: “teenager,” “transgender,” “homeless,” “assaulted recently,” “says she feels a full-grown baby kicking.” I immediately asked if I could see this patient, and was sent out to admit her.

Side by side picture of filing system in Soroti Uganda medical cliinic

Editors’ Note: This summer, four medical students and two research trainees from Albert Einstein College of Medicine traveled to Soroti, Uganda, to treat diabetes as part of Einstein’s Global Diabetes Institute. We are featuring a series of posts detailing their challenges and progress. In this post, second-year M.D. student Madelyn Klugman shares her experiences. The Read More

Young woman taking an exam

Editors’ note: Last week, we published a post by Dr. Felise Milan concerning the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 2 exam and controversy over its existence. This week, M.D. student Sukhjot Sandher looks at the stress accompanying the USMLE Step 1 exam and its long-term implications. This post originally appeared on The EJBM Blog Read More

Female doctor examining a patient

In June, the American Medical Association passed a resolution calling for an end to the clinical portion of the licensing exam required for all physicians in the U.S. The impetus for this was a group of medical students understandably unhappy about the exam’s expense ($1,275) and the cost to travel to one of the five Read More